UK Government Plans To Ban Wet Wipes

Wet Wipes Saved From Oceans & Sewers: 1 401 349

How to Stop Diarrhea and Relieve Discomfort

Diarrhea is more frequent and more liquid bowel movements than normal. There are many causes of diarrhea, including food intolerance, viral and bacterial infections, as well as parasites, intestinal disorders or diseases (like irritable bowel syndrome) and reactions to medications. Most diarrhea will go away on its own within two to three days – as diarrhea has many causes then we advise to always consult with your doctor, do it immediately if you notice mucus or blood in your stool, experience persistent abdominal pain, or show symptoms of dehydration. Common symptoms of diarrhea include frequent, watery stools, abdominal cramping and bloating.

How to Deal with Diarrhea:

  1. Drink Plenty of Fluids. One of the biggest problems with diarrhea, and what leads many people to the emergency room, is dehydration. Diarrhea causes the body to lose a lot of water and electrolytes it needs to function normally. If not treated appropriately, dehydration can become dangerous, especially in young children.
  2. Priobiotics. Sometimes, diarrhea results from an imbalance of bacteria in the gut. Probiotics help restore balance by providing a higher level of good bacteria. This can promote normal bowel function and shorten the duration of diarrhea.
  3. BRAT Diet. BRAT stands for bananas, rice, applesauce, and toast. This diet is effective due to the bland nature of these foods, and the fact that they’re starchy, low-fiber foods. These foods have a binding effect in the digestive tract to make stools bulkier. And since they’re bland, they’re less likely to irritate your stomach or worsen diarrhea.
  4. Soft Toilet Paper + Gel. Lot of wiping can irritate skin and cause pain. Use extra soft tissue together with SATU toilet paper gel to be properly clean and soothe sore skin.
  5. Keep Yourself Germ Free. Be sure to wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water when you are finished.

 

Read more:

Guide For Men: How To Keep Your Private Parts Clean

Are You Walking Around With Dirty Anus? A Guide To Good Butt Hygiene

The Best Flushable Wet Wipes Alternatives

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Flushable Wet Wipes Alternatives: Bidet, Gel, Water Bucket or Something Else?

Since the discovery of the germ theory of disease in the second half of the 19th century, hygiene and sanitation have been at the forefront of the struggle against illness and disease. Due to the current pandemic situation around the world, good personal hygiene is a hot topic again. Household and baby wipes demand soars amid COVID-19 crisis but it also brings international attention to the issue lurking beneath our feet. Wet wipes, originally used for cleaning babies, have grown in popularity in recent years and are increasingly marketed as a replacement for toilet paper.

Nowadays more and more adults are using wet wipes for improving their personal hygiene because they care about their bottom health and spotless underwear. However, while single use wet wipes are easy to use, environmental concerns have raised the need for alternatives.

The major disadvantages of wet wipes according to wastewater treatment specialists, plumbers, and environmental organizations include:

Bloomberg: “America’s Obsession With Wipes Is Tearing Up Sewer Systems”

U.S. municipalities shell out at least $1 BILLION annually on maintenance to remove clogs caused by wipes, according to the National Association of Clean Water Agencies, a group that advocates for better water policies. In Charleston, South Carolina, the problem has gotten so bad during the pandemic that the city’s water management agency filed a lawsuit against major manufacturers and retailers, accusing them of falsely labeling some wipes as flushable.

New York City is calling on residents to “trash it. Don’t flush it.” King County, Washington, which is home to Seattle, has a similar message.

Trash it. Don’t Flush it.

Great initiative from the City of New York!

Wet wipes—yes, even the ones that say “flushable,” condoms, feminine products, paper towels (and all the other stuff) that you flush down your toilet enters our sewer system and mixes with the grease that you have poured down your sink. This mix of personal hygiene products and grease can create “fatbergs” in our sewers.

Global Committee of Water Experts Releases Flushability Guidelines

We welcome the release of new international guidelines for what can be flushed down the toilet. We support efforts in Australia to develop an Australian standard for flushable products. You should only flush the three P’s: pee, poo & paper.

The growth in the number of wipes and related products labeled “flushable” over the past 15 years has been a multi-million dollar headache for water utilities around the globe.